Plating – What is it and what are the benefits?

Image of tube with platingWe have all heard of gold plated jewellery and silver plated cutlery. But how many of us actually understand what plating is and how else it can be used, especially in industry? Here at PRV, plating is a big part of what we do as a company. 

Silver and tin plating are essential finishes for parts that are designed to carry heavy electrical currents.

What is plating and what are the benefits ?

Plating is a surface covering in which a metal is deposited on a conductive surface. Plating has been around for many years but is seen as critical for modern technology. Typically plating is used to to decorate objects, for corrosion inhibition, to improve solderability, to harden, to improve wearability, to reduce friction, to improve paint adhesion, to alter conductivity, for radiation shielding and for other purposes too. Continue reading

New Plating Facility – PRV Engineering continue Bold Investment Strategy

PRV_blog_logoThe new plating facility that PRV Engineering now has is yet another example of Simon Jones’ (Chief Exec of PRV) determination to offer the company’s clients the most comprehensive service through continuous investment into new areas.

The Importance of Finishing

Finishing is one of the most important areas in the engineering sector. Components that have been carefully machined to the highest standards and tightest specifications can still be scrapped if the finishing is not up to standard. It’s one of the reasons that PRV Engineering prefer to do as much manufacturing as possible in-house. The new plating facility, specialising in tin and silver plating, is another sure step in this direction. Continue reading

Why Are Copper BusBars Plated?

Even though copper is the most popular choice for use in busbars, and used very often in other electrical applications because it is more resistant to rust and corrosion than other metals, this doesn’t mean that it won’t oxidize over time.

When metals oxidize, the resistance in the conductive metal will increase, requiring more power to be used to carry current along the surface. When the copper oxidizes beyond a certain point, the metal can begin to flake and fall apart. Continue reading