Finishing in manufacturing is as important as starting

manufacturing engine partsWhen it comes to manufacturing parts or components the way each one is finished reflects the quality of workmanship. If you don’t finish a job properly, then it doesn’t matter how careful you’ve been with the initial production, cutting or moulding, the end product is not going to look good. And the way the end product looks will always have an impact on saleability.

There could, of course, also be an impact on your costs. If your customer is unhappy with the finish of an order, you may have to start all over again, meaning more waste and increased costs. And there’s the health and safety aspect of poor finishing. Rough or sharp edges won’t be acceptable to your customer and may also cause injuries to those working with them. Continue reading

Subcon 2016 speakers give their thoughts on the industry

Subcon 2016Subcon 2016 is only a few weeks away now and with that in mind the organisers have asked some of their speakers their views and opinions on some key areas of manufacturing.

Not surprisingly, when asked about the biggest challenge facing the industry this year, 4 of the 7 said that they saw political and economic uncertainty as a major challenge in the coming months. The debate about staying or leaving the EU means that people are reconsidering longer term commitments and may even be delaying projects as they are unsure as to how they will be affected. Things will be clearer after the referendum in June, but there still may be longer term issues to consider depending on the outcome. It would be prudent for any business to consider the impact on them should the result be that the UK exits the EU. Of course it will take time for any exit policies and agreements to be put into place, but there’s likely to be some sort of immediate impact on existing contracts and projects. Should the vote be to stay in, then of course, things will settle back down, but it still may take a little time for that uncertainty to settle completely. Continue reading

Further investment at PRV Engineering

PRV Engineering site“Investment is essential to the future of PRV Engineering” says CEO Simon Jones.

Over the past two years there have been huge investments in equipment and premises to ensure that PRV Engineering can provide the best customer service possible.

1.5 million pounds worth of state of the art CNC Multi Axis/Multi Discipline machining centres have been installed, a new temperature controlled inspection facility and an 8000 sq ft extension with have also been completed.

Finishing is one of the most important areas in the engineering sector. Components that have been carefully machined to the highest standards and tightest specifications can still be scrapped if the finishing is not up to standard. To ensure the best finishes are provided to clients, PRV Engineering decided not to rely on external companies for their plating requirements and instead, bought their own plating facility, ensuring that they could supply a full One Stop Shop service to clients. Continue reading

Growth predicted in the global busbar market

busbar imagesA recent report Busbar Market indicates that the market size will rise from $12,321.9 million to $16,038.6 million by 2020.

This is largely due to rise in energy demands, the growing construction sector and increased upgrading of electrical infrastructures. Growth in related areas such as switchgear transformers is also contributing to the growth of the busbar market. Continue reading

Flooding and the rail network

rail Industry switchesLess than a week after the good news that Carlisle station is to get a £14.7m upgrade the rail network in the north, and particularly Carlisle has suffered at the hands of Storm Desmond. Stations have no power and long stretches of track are under water causing travel chaos.

Whilst Network Rail are promising to get things back up and running as soon as humanly possible, the safety of rail passengers has to be at the forefront of everything being done. So whilst in an ideal world commuters would love to back to normal as soon as possible, there is much more to getting back to normal than just the water receding. Network Rail’s crews of maintenance people (known as the Orange Army) are clearing fallen trees and landslip debris where they can (read more here), but it’s not just what’s fallen onto the tracks that is the issue. Continue reading