The next generation of UK engineers

UK engineers bridge imageToday Sir James Dyson announced that he is to open his own institute to train engineers stating that the UK needs another million engineers in software, hardware and electronics by 2020 if UK companies are to remain competitive.

The institute, based in Malmesbury, Wiltshire will open in the Autumn of 2017 with an initial intake of 25 students and will offer a four year engineering degree in partnership with the University of Warwick. Students will be paid a salary while studying and will not pay tuition fees, but most importantly in the world of engineering, students will work on live projects alongside mentors and research staff allowing them to get hands on, real life experience. Continue reading

Growth predicted in the global busbar market

busbar imagesA recent report Busbar Market indicates that the market size will rise from $12,321.9 million to $16,038.6 million by 2020.

This is largely due to rise in energy demands, the growing construction sector and increased upgrading of electrical infrastructures. Growth in related areas such as switchgear transformers is also contributing to the growth of the busbar market. Continue reading

How do we solve the skills gap in the UK?

skills gap graphicA recent survey revealed that Finance Directors are more worried about the skills shortage in the UK than they are about the UK remaining in Europe. In fact, it ranked second only to concerns regarding the oil price. A worrying statement!

We ourselves have written previously about the skills shortage in engineering indicating that the practical skills needed are not being taught early enough. The misheld perception that engineering jobs are ‘dirty’ and carried out in oil covered overalls or while wearing hard hats on a building site is a perception we need to change. Schools need to open the eyes of their students to the possibilities of engineering careers out there. We also need to ensure that the practical skills that come with these jobs are taught and practiced throughout any period of education. There is little point in learning the theory of how to do something for 3 or 4 years and then not being able to apply that practically when looking for employment.

It seems, that these concerns do not only relate to engineering, but to employment as a whole in the UK. A report by the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants recently stated that UK school leavers are the worst in Europe for essential skills. Whether they are leaving school at 18 or graduating later, employers state that students are lacking the skills they are looking for. It seems the most basic skills such as communication and teamwork are a struggle for many and is given as a major factor when deciding whether to employ a young person. Continue reading

Addressing The Shortfall – UK Engineering Expertise

engineering word cloudIt’s no secret how much engineering is worth to the UK economy. Estimates are that engineering makes up almost a quarter of UK turnover. As a percentage of UK GDP engineering grew steadily through the global financial crisis. It is clear that the UK is still an engineering powerhouse with world renowned expertise, projects and businesses.

  • UK has 17% of the Global Share of Aerospace revenue
  • £30.7 billion in automotive exports
  • UK Engineering sector employs 5.5 million people
  • Bioscience and Renewable Energy sectors on the cutting edge

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Tunnelling feats of engineering

tunnelling machineAs one marathon amount of tunnelling is just completing another is about to begin.

The 26 miles of crossrail tunnelling, linking rail services from Reading and Heathrow in the West to Shenfield and Abbey wood in the East finished in June after 3 years of constant tunnelling. 8 giant tunnelling machines were used constantly to make the network of new rail tunnels, and whilst there are still stations and platforms to construct it is hoped the civil engineering work will be complete in 2017 with the new rail services starting from 2018.

The new services will allow an extra 24 trains an hour to run during peak services and will increase rail capacity by 10% carrying 72,000 passengers per hour through the new tunnels. 1.5 million more people will be able travel to within 45 minutes of central London.

However, as one feat of tunnelling engineering ends another is about to begin. The Thames Tideway Project preliminary construction works begin in 2016, with the proposed 4 years of tunnelling beginning in 2017. Continue reading

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